Let’s Take A Moment Day 396

Hi everyone.  Hope you are all well and continue to stay that way during this global health crisis we are facing.  But in addition to protecting your physical wellness, what are you doing to stay mentally healthy today?

May 2021 blog

(Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

I know we are still facing a serious situation but a new year gives us hope for the new days, seasons, opportunities & moments ahead. Still, music is something that will never change for me. It is my refuge, the most comforting part of my life & the one thing I consistently count on. So until a more normal semblance of life returns, I am going to share a song I listen to that helps me escape the current state of things, if only for a few minutes each day. And if this helps anyone else, even better.

One of my favorite movies of all time is “Breakfast at Tiffany’s“. I loved everything about it-the era it took place in, the beautiful city it was set in and, of course, Audrey Hepburn as Holly Golightly. Her facial & verbal expressions, her wardrobe, her apartment…..it was all fabulousness defined.. And how many times have we all wanted to run away & start our lives over again some place new, but she actually did it! Yes, it caught up with her but still, she did it!!!

I also loved the sweet look on the face of her neighbor, Paul (George Peppard) as he watched Holly playing guitar & singing from his apartment window. The lyrics of that song were written by Johnny Mercer & the music was by premier film composer Enrico Nicola Mancini, known professionally as Henry Mancini. It earned him the Oscar for Best Original Song in 1962. Born on April 16, 1924 in Ohio, he also wrote the theme to several movies including “The Pink Panther” series. His arrangement of the “Love Theme from Romeo and Juliet” (a/k/a “A Time For Us”) spent two weeks at #1 in the summer of 1969. Mancini also wrote the themes to a number of television shows including “Peter Gunn”, “Newhart”, “Hotel” & Remington Steele”.

Some of my favorite artists have performed their own exceptional renditions of today’s song including Rod Stewart, Pete Yorn, and my great musical loves Elton John and Eric Clapton (with Jeff Beck). But as much as I love those, it is the movie version I come back to whenever I need to relive the beauty & the magic of the film all over again.

Two drifters off to see the world
There’s such a lot of world to see
We’re after the same rainbow’s end
Waitin’ ’round the bend
“.

Breakfast-at-Tiffanys

George Peppard and Audrey Hepburn in a scene from 1961’s classic, “Breakfast At Tiffany’s”. (Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

Audrey Hepburn: “Moon River” (1961, music written by Henry Mancini, lyrics by Johnny Mercer).

I do not own the rights to anything.  I am just sharing what I love and how I am coping with you.

Stay well.

Let’s Take A Moment Day 332

Hi everyone.  Hope you are all well and continue to stay that way during this global health crisis we are facing.  But in addition to protecting your physical wellness, what are you doing to stay mentally healthy today?

Feb 2021 Blog

(Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

I know we are still facing a serious situation but a new year gives us hope for the new days, seasons, opportunities & moments ahead. Still, music is something that will never change for me. It is my refuge, the most comforting part of my life & the one thing I consistently count on. So until a more normal semblance of life returns, I am going to share a song I listen to that helps me escape the current state of things, if only for a few minutes each day. And if this helps anyone else, even better.

On this day in 1957 Patsy Cline released today’s song. It was her first hit & went on to become one of her signature tunes. She re-recorded the track in 1961 with Elvis Presley’s backup group, The Jordanaires. But as wonderful as that version is, I prefer the original. It has a slightly slower tempo, more like a shuffle & a simpler arrangement which showcases the strength & beauty of Cline’s voice even more.

I stop to see a weepin’ willow
Cryin’ on his pillow
Maybe he’s cryin’ for me
“.

Patsy

Patsy Cline circa 1961. (Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

Patsy Cline: “Walkin’ After Midnight” (1957, written by Alan Block and Donn Hecht).

I do not own the rights to anything.  I am just sharing what I love and how I am coping with you.

Stay well.

Let’s Take A Moment Day 176

Hi everyone.  Hope you are all well and continue to stay that way during this global health crisis we are facing.  But in addition to protecting your physical wellness, what are you doing to stay mentally healthy today?

Bruce quote

(Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

I know we are in a serious situation, but I need a break from the gloom, doom and bullying by way of hoarding. Music has always been my refuge and watching those beautiful Italians singing to each other from their balconies reaffirmed my belief that music is the answer. So until the old normal returns, I am going to share a song I listen to that helps me escape the current state of things, if only for a few minutes each day.  And if this helps anyone else, even better.

Today marks the 88th birth anniversary of country legend, Patsy Cline.  Born Virginia Patterson Hensley in Winchester, VA in 1932, she started singing professionally at age 15 to support her family after her father left them.  He was an amateur singer who passed on his talent to her from an early age.  Cline got her stage surname from her first husband, Gerald Cline (married 1953, divorced 1957) while her first name was a variation on her middle one.  She became a regular on a regional TV show in 1954 which led to her first recording contract with 4 Star Records.  After six years with them and no success, she signed with Decca Records where her career blossomed.  Before a plane crash ended her life at age 30 on March 5, 1963, she had two children, a girl & a boy.  Her daughter,  Julie Symadore Fudge, runs a museum in Nashville dedicated to her mother.  It features many of Cline’s stage clothes which she designed and were hand made by her mother, Hilda Hensley.

Cline recorded today’s song for her 1961 album, “Showcase”.  She recorded it with The Jordanaires, who were the backing vocal group for Elvis Presley.  This record has several of her best known songs including “Walking After Midnight”, “Crazy”, “San Antonio Rose” and the track featured today.

According to The Country Music Hall Of Fame, Cline is the most popular female country singer in recording history.  She is also listed as the first solo female artist inducted into that hallowed group.  One listen to her deep beautiful unique voice and you know why both of those facts exist.

I fall to pieces
Each time someone speaks your name 
I fall to pieces
Time only adds to the flame“.

patsy

Patsy Cline circa 1962.  (Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

Patsy Cline:  “I Fall To Pieces” ( 1961, written by Hank Cochran and Harlan Howard).

I do not own the rights to anything.  I am just sharing what I love and how I am coping with you.

Stay well.

Let’s Take A Moment Day 22

Hi everyone.  Hope you are all well and continue to stay that way during this global health crisis we are facing.  But in addition to protecting your physical wellness, what are you doing to stay mentally healthy today?

music heart

(Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

I know we are in a serious situation, but I need a break from the gloom, doom and bullying by way of hoarding. Music has always been my refuge and watching those beautiful Italians singing to each other from their balconies reaffirmed my belief that music is the answer. So until the old normal returns, I am going to share a song I listen to that helps me escape the current state of things, if only for a few minutes each day. And if this helps anyone else, even better.

When Bruce Springsteen was inducting today’s singer into the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame in 1987, he said, “I wanted to sing like Roy Orbison. Now, everybody knows that nobody sings like Roy Orbison.”  If there was ever one voice so completely recognizable from the very first note he sang, it was Orbison’s.  It sounded almost operatic with his smooth and rich delivery, earning him the nickname “the Caruso of Rock”.  Even when he was singing with the likes of Bob Dylan, George Harrison and the other Traveling Wilburys in the late 1980’s, Orbison’s sound took center stage.  Springsteen has covered today’s song many times as an encore in his own concerts, and Orbison re-recorded it himself as a duet with k.d. lang in 1987.  It was very nicely done, but I prefer the original recording from 1961.

Roy Orbison

Roy Orbison circa 1964 (Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

Roy Orbison:  “Crying” (1961, written by Roy Orbison and Joe Melson).

I do not own the rights to anything.  I am just sharing what I love and how I am coping with you.

Stay well.