Let’s Take A Moment Day 494

Hi everyone.  Hope you are all well and continue to stay that way during this global health crisis we are facing.  But in addition to protecting your physical wellness, what are you doing to stay mentally healthy today?

Tom Petty music quote

(Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

I know we are still facing a serious situation but a new year gives us hope for the new days, seasons, opportunities & moments ahead. Still, music is something that will never change for me. It is my refuge, the most comforting part of my life & the one thing I consistently count on. So until a more normal semblance of life returns, I am going to share a song I listen to that helps me escape the current state of things, if only for a few minutes each day. And if this helps anyone else, even better.

In March 1992 Bruce Springsteen released two albums on the same day. It was not his original plan, but when the debut of Human Touch was delayed and rescheduled closer to the when the next record, Lucky Town, was due to come out, he decided to just let them go together. These records were his first after he dissolved the The E Street Band in 1989. But despite their absence, Springsteen’s classic unmistakable sound was still undeniable.

So you been broken and you been hurt
Show me somebody who ain’t
Yeah I know I ain’t nobody’s bargain
But hell a little touchup and a little paint
“.

Bruce

Bruce Springsteen circa 1992. (Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

Bruce Springsteen: “Human Touch” (1992, written by Bruce Springsteen).

I do not own the rights to anything.  I am just sharing what I love and how I am coping with you.

Stay well.

Let’s Take A Moment Day 480

Hi everyone.  Hope you are all well and continue to stay that way during this global health crisis we are facing.  But in addition to protecting your physical wellness, what are you doing to stay mentally healthy today?

Tom Petty music quote

(Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

I know we are still facing a serious situation but a new year gives us hope for the new days, seasons, opportunities & moments ahead. Still, music is something that will never change for me. It is my refuge, the most comforting part of my life & the one thing I consistently count on. So until a more normal semblance of life returns, I am going to share a song I listen to that helps me escape the current state of things, if only for a few minutes each day. And if this helps anyone else, even better.

Years before Bruce Springsteen broke into the Top Twenty with one of his own tunes (“Hungry Heart” was a #5 hit in 1980/1981) other artists had successful covers with his songs: Manfred Mann’s Earth Band’s version of “Blinded By The Light” (Day 340) hit #1 in February 1977, Patti Smith’s version of “Because The Night” (Day 67) reached the Top 20 in 1978, the same year The Pointer Sisters released today’s song. It became a #2 hit in February 1979.

Springsteen originally recorded it during the sessions for his 1978 Darkness On The Edge Of Town album, but the song was ultimately left off the final cut. He released it in 1987 as a single. He also included a live version in his boxed set Live 1975–85 as well as an updated track in his 2010 The Promise collection. Of course nothing will ever beat his original recordings in my book. But The Pointer Sisters did The Boss proud with their sensational cover.

Well Romeo and Juliet
Samson and Delilah
Baby you can bet
A love they couldn’t deny
“.

bruce

Pointer

Top: Bruce Springsteen’s 45′ cover for “Fire”. Bottom: The Pointer Sisters 1978 album, Energy. (Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

The Pointer Sisters: “Fire” (1978, written by Bruce Springsteen).

I do not own the rights to anything.  I am just sharing what I love and how I am coping with you.

Stay well.

Let’s Take A Moment Day 458

Hi everyone.  Hope you are all well and continue to stay that way during this global health crisis we are facing.  But in addition to protecting your physical wellness, what are you doing to stay mentally healthy today?

June 2021 blog

(Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

I know we are still facing a serious situation but a new year gives us hope for the new days, seasons, opportunities & moments ahead. Still, music is something that will never change for me. It is my refuge, the most comforting part of my life & the one thing I consistently count on. So until a more normal semblance of life returns, I am going to share a song I listen to that helps me escape the current state of things, if only for a few minutes each day. And if this helps anyone else, even better.

When I saw the “No Nukes” movie I discovered one of Bruce Springsteen’s favorite songs because he did a cover of it for the concert. The original version was a #1 song for two weeks in the summer of 1961 by singer Gary U.S. Bonds. He was born Gary Anderson on June 6, 1939 in Florida and began singing in church as a child. When he was about 20 years old he signed with Legrand Records and worked closely with producer Frank Guida. He co-wrote today’s song with two other people & Bonds provided the vocal arrangement.

He had two other hits in the early 1960’s-“New Orleans” and “School Is Out”-before his career plateaued as a result of the British Invasion. But Springsteen & his best friend/guitarist Steven Van Zandt remained huge fans and got the chance to work with Bonds in 1980. The following year his album Dedication was released & revived his career.

It contained the Top 20 hit, “This Little Girl”, a song Springsteen wrote to be included on The River album, but he decided Bonds would be a better fit for the track. The Boss wrote two other songs for the album, Van Zandt contributed one as well and the rest of The E Street Band performed all the music for the project. And all that happened because Springsteen heard today’s song when he was 11 years old & it stayed with him for the rest of his life. I can totally relate.

I never had it so good
Yeah and I know you never could
Until you get hip with that jive
And take a band like the Church Street Five
“.

Bonds 1960

Dedication

Top: Gary U.S. Bonds circa 1960. Bottom: His 1981 album, Dedication. (Images found online.  Original sources unknown.)

Gary U.S. Bonds: “Quarter To Three” (1961, written by Gary Anderson, Gene Barge, Frank J. Guida and Joseph F. Royster.

I do not own the rights to anything.  I am just sharing what I love and how I am coping with you.

Stay well.

Let’s Take A Moment Day 445

Hi everyone.  Hope you are all well and continue to stay that way during this global health crisis we are facing.  But in addition to protecting your physical wellness, what are you doing to stay mentally healthy today?

June 2021 blog

(Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

I know we are still facing a serious situation but a new year gives us hope for the new days, seasons, opportunities & moments ahead. Still, music is something that will never change for me. It is my refuge, the most comforting part of my life & the one thing I consistently count on. So until a more normal semblance of life returns, I am going to share a song I listen to that helps me escape the current state of things, if only for a few minutes each day. And if this helps anyone else, even better.

On June 1, 1978 Bruce Springsteen released Darkness On The Edge Of Town. It was the follow up to his masterpiece, Born To Run & the second album with his new manager Jon Landau. For those of you who may not know, he was a rock critic who saw The Boss live in 1974 prompting Landau to write the now famous quote: “I saw rock and roll future and its name is Bruce Springsteen”.

Life would change exponentially for both men after the release of Born In The U.S.A. on June 4, 1984. It was an enormous smash, yielding seven Top Ten hits & catapulted Springsteen to a level of stardom few had ever seen. But the seriousness of the songs was overshadowed by the videos, a catch 22 common in the early days of the MTV era.

The lead off single, “Dancing In The Dark”, was a tale of self-loathing & internal angst. But that message was lost by both the song’s upbeat tempo and the glitzy performance video as well. And the title track, a commentary on the plight of Vietnam veterans who struggled to find their way back, became an anthem of patriotism & national pride. The clips in the video showing Springsteen dressed in red, white & blue punching his fist in the air during the chorus only aided that misconception.

But ultimately that album was like every Springsteen record before & after. It was about struggling, disappointed disenfranchised people looking for a way to escape their sad reality. And for those chasing the promise of the American dream, only to discover it is just the pursuit of happiness that is guaranteed in our country’s declaration, not the actual achievement of it. And as Springsteen sang in an outtake song from the Darkness album sessions, “When the promise is broken you go on living, but it steals something from down in your soul”. His words are heartbreaking. raw & sublime, just like life.

Today’s song is in that tradition, albeit at a faster tempo. It’s all about wanting to shut the door & hide from the outside world & let love keep you safe. Who has not felt like that more than once in their lives, especially in the last 12 months? And the fact that the singer is asking his partner for help & not expecting her to read his mind? Well, swoon.

I loved this song so much I got not one but two sets of special license plates in tribute to it. However once road rage became part of the vernacular, I reluctantly gave them up. But I still have one……..framed. Yes, I am that girl. A Boss fan.

Now promise me baby
You won’t let them find us
Hold me in your arms
Let’s let our love blind us
“.

Cover

(Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

Bruce Springsteen: “Cover Me” (1984, written by Bruce Springsteen).

I do not own the rights to anything.  I am just sharing what I love and how I am coping with you.

Stay well.

Let’s Take A Moment Day 441

Hi everyone.  Hope you are all well and continue to stay that way during this global health crisis we are facing.  But in addition to protecting your physical wellness, what are you doing to stay mentally healthy today?

Memorial Day

(Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

I know we are still facing a serious situation but a new year gives us hope for the new days, seasons, opportunities & moments ahead. Still, music is something that will never change for me. It is my refuge, the most comforting part of my life & the one thing I consistently count on. So until a more normal semblance of life returns, I am going to share a song I listen to that helps me escape the current state of things, if only for a few minutes each day. And if this helps anyone else, even better.

Admittedly I was not much of a fan of folk music in my teenage years. I had heard a few artists from that genre & knew it was not a sound I could ever embrace. But as my love of music grew I found another artist who embraced that sound-namely, Bob Dylan. Of course I found the beauty of his words & music remarkable & realized how far reaching his influence was, especially on my great musical love, Bruce Springsteen. But who was a great influence on Dylan? One of the biggest was Woody Guthrie.

Today the folk genre is more commonly known today as “roots music” or Americana which includes the early sounds not only of folk but blues, country, rhythm & blues and rock influences. Guthrie embodied all those sounds and made them his own.

Legend tells us he wrote today’s song as a somewhat snarky answer to Irving Berlin’s “God Bless America” which Guthrie was tired of hearing so often on the radio in the late 1930’s. He wrote some of the lyrics in 1940 but did not do anything with the tune until he revisited it in 1944. That is when he played it for a record company executive changing the course of Guthrie’s life from a Merchant Marine to a professional musician & artist.

The melody has been attributed to a song by The Carter Family (yes, Johnny Cash’s in-laws) but Guthrie’s tune used a different structure of the earlier one. The lyrics, however, are all his. And they are quite beautiful. I remember singing this song in my elementary school music class quite often. Each time I envisioned the scenes Guthrie wrote about and dreamt of the day I could see it all. But music, like the pages of a book, made me feel as if I already had. That is the power of great art.

On this Memorial Day 2021, we celebrate this great land of ours, the great freedoms we have here because of those who paid the highest price for us to have it. We owe them all a debt of gratitude.

As I went walking that ribbon of highway
I saw above me that endless skyway
Saw below me that golden valley
This land was made for you and me
“.

W Guthrie

Woody Guthrie circa 1945. (Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

Woody Guthrie: “This Land Is Your Land” (1944, written by Woody Guthrie).

I do not own the rights to anything.  I am just sharing what I love and how I am coping with you.

Stay well.

Let’s Take A Moment Day 440

Hi everyone.  Hope you are all well and continue to stay that way during this global health crisis we are facing.  But in addition to protecting your physical wellness, what are you doing to stay mentally healthy today?

May 30 image

(Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

I know we are still facing a serious situation but a new year gives us hope for the new days, seasons, opportunities & moments ahead. Still, music is something that will never change for me. It is my refuge, the most comforting part of my life & the one thing I consistently count on. So until a more normal semblance of life returns, I am going to share a song I listen to that helps me escape the current state of things, if only for a few minutes each day. And if this helps anyone else, even better.

Today’s song is a reminder that freedom is for us all, no matter how different we are. From the lucky to the forsaken, from the broken to the beautiful, from the pacifist to the fighter. But what we share in common is our debt to those who sacrificed it all for the lives we are free to live.

Far between sundown’s finish and midnight’s broken toll
We ducked inside the doorway thunder crashing
As majestic bells of bolts struck shadows in the sounds
Seeming to be the chimes of freedom flashing


Flashing for the warriors whose strength is not to fight
Flashing for the refugees on the unarmed road of flight
And for each and every underdog soldier in the night
And we gazed upon the chimes of freedom flashing.”

Bruce_Springsteen_1988

Bruce Springsteen circa 1988. (Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

Bruce Springsteen: “Chimes Of Freedom” (1988, written by Bob Dylan).

I do not own the rights to anything.  I am just sharing what I love and how I am coping with you.

Stay well.

Let’s Take A Moment Day 434

Hi everyone.  Hope you are all well and continue to stay that way during this global health crisis we are facing.  But in addition to protecting your physical wellness, what are you doing to stay mentally healthy today?

May blog 2021

(Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

I know we are still facing a serious situation but a new year gives us hope for the new days, seasons, opportunities & moments ahead. Still, music is something that will never change for me. It is my refuge, the most comforting part of my life & the one thing I consistently count on. So until a more normal semblance of life returns, I am going to share a song I listen to that helps me escape the current state of things, if only for a few minutes each day. And if this helps anyone else, even better.

Today we celebrate another milestone birthday. This one belongs to the man with the voice that defined the 1960’s. Bob Dylan celebrates his 80th birthday today and if there was one musician who defined the decade of change, it was him. Born May 24, 1941 in Minnesota, he was only 21 years old when he released his debut album nearly six decades ago in 1962. His folk songs became anthems for a generation.

But just when people saw him as the Woody Guthrie of his generation, Dylan went electric with his music and gave us even more to think about. Along the way he influenced The Beatles especially his future Traveling Wilburys’ bandmate George Harrison, David Bowie, Bruce Springsteen, Patti Smith, Neil Young, Pete Townsend, all five members of his back-up group, The Band, and so many others.

Dylan’s accolades range from nearly every music award to every songwriter’s award to his Nobel Prize in Literature. With anthems like “Blowin’ In The Wind”, “Like A Rolling Stone” and today’s song, to his well known recordings including “A Hard Rain’s a-Gonna Fall”, “Positively 4th Street”, “I Shall Be Released”, “Mr. Tambourine Man”, “My Back Pages” and countless others, Bob Dylan is without a doubt one of the most important voices in cultural & musical history. Happy birthday to The Master Poet. Here’s to 100 more.

As the present now
Will later be past
The order is rapidly fadin’
And the first one now
Will later be last
“.

Dylan

Bob Dylan circa 1964. (Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

Bob Dylan: “The Times They Are A-Changin’” (1964, written by Bob Dylan).

I do not own the rights to anything.  I am just sharing what I love and how I am coping with you.

Stay well.

Let’s Take A Moment Day 412

Hi everyone.  Hope you are all well and continue to stay that way during this global health crisis we are facing.  But in addition to protecting your physical wellness, what are you doing to stay mentally healthy today?

May blog 2021

(Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

I know we are still facing a serious situation but a new year gives us hope for the new days, seasons, opportunities & moments ahead. Still, music is something that will never change for me. It is my refuge, the most comforting part of my life & the one thing I consistently count on. So until a more normal semblance of life returns, I am going to share a song I listen to that helps me escape the current state of things, if only for a few minutes each day. And if this helps anyone else, even better.

Back in 1910 a man named John Hammond was born in NYC. He worked at various music related jobs including critic, record producer and talent scout for Columbia Records. He was the one responsible for signing Aretha Franklin & Bob Dylan to the label in the early 1960’s. If that was all Hammond did in his life, what a contribution that was.

But then a decade later he met a guy named Bruce Springsteen & invited him to audition for the label as well. That took place on May 2, 1972. A fifteen minute meeting turned into a two hour session & the next day Springsteen recorded a fourteen song demo. Even after all that, it took five more weeks before the label signed him. But they did & Springsteen has spent his nearly five decade career with that record company which is now owned by Sony Music Entertainment.

His music has touched my heart a thousand different times in a thousand different ways. In the process, he became one of the greatest friends I have known in my life. His three to four hour live shows have been the highlight of every year I have been lucky enough to see him. And a few years ago he conquered Broadway with a stunning one-man show about the songs that shaped his career. All the roads of his career lead back to his meeting with John Hammond & that audition nearly 50 years ago today.

All my life I fought the fight
The fight that you can’t ever win
Every day it just gets harder to live
The dream you’re believing in
“.

Bruce and John

Bruce Springsteen (L) and John Hammond (R) circa 1972. (Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

Bruce Springsteen: “The Promise” (1999, written by Bruce Springsteen).

I do not own the rights to anything.  I am just sharing what I love and how I am coping with you.

Stay well.

Let’s Take A Moment Day 411

Hi everyone.  Hope you are all well and continue to stay that way during this global health crisis we are facing.  But in addition to protecting your physical wellness, what are you doing to stay mentally healthy today?

May blog 2021

(Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

I know we are still facing a serious situation but a new year gives us hope for the new days, seasons, opportunities & moments ahead. Still, music is something that will never change for me. It is my refuge, the most comforting part of my life & the one thing I consistently count on. So until a more normal semblance of life returns, I am going to share a song I listen to that helps me escape the current state of things, if only for a few minutes each day. And if this helps anyone else, even better.

I was raised in a home with a very progressive grandmother. However, that did not mean she was open to everything. And while I was fully immersed in my teenage music addiction, she stepped in with the kiss of death: censorship.

Two albums prompted this course of action. The first was by my great musical love, Eric Clapton. The first time I put “Slowhand” on the stereo, she questioned why I would listen to someone exalting the benefits of “Cocaine”. I thought telling her he did not write the song would be enough to ease her mind. It only begged the question “Was he too high to write it?”

I skipped to the next song which was “Wonderful Tonight”. No problem. But when I was singing along to track three (“Lay Down Sally”), once again she became irritated. She demanded I turn off a song that was clearly “suggestive”. And let me just add that when your 65 year old grandmother uses a word like that, it conjures up images that are horrifying. From that point on, I listened to Clapton in my room alone.

Not long after that debacle I was starting to explore Neil Young’s rock side so I borrowed a copy of his second solo album from a friend. Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere. which was released 52 years ago today on May 1, 1969 featured the song, “Down By The River”. Admittedly, I found the subject matter disturbing. A man singing about killing the woman he loved was not the stuff songs were made of in my world. But I got completely swept up in Young’s mesmerizing guitar riffs until my grandmother’s screams snapped me out of my musical reverie.

A conversation about whether or not I was using drugs ensued followed by who was more disturbed-a person who expressed such a terrifying thought in a song or the person (read: me) who listened to it. Thinking I was helping the situation, I pointed out to my grandmother that when Young referred to shooting his “baby”, it was not his child but rather his girlfriend. It did not take long for me to see that only made things a million times worse.

Threats of taking my records away & removing the stereo from the house were mentioned as was a lecture from my father when he got home about how my musical choices could be harmful to my five year old brother. The phrase “Too bad military schools do not accept girls” was also batted around. My grandmother monitored my listening choices for the next several weeks which consisted mostly of my Bruce Springsteen records that she enjoyed as much as I did. Soon life took over and another crisis emerged so my indiscretion eventually became old news.

But my love for Neil Young never subsided and today’s song from that same album became my favorite track from the record. And at least this tune does not conjure up memories of the brief period in my life when my house turned into a deleted scene from the movie “Footloose”.

Ten silver saxes
A bass with a bow
The drummer relaxes
And waits between shows
“.

Neil Young

(Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

Neil Young: “Cinnamon Girl” (1969, written by Neil Young).

I do not own the rights to anything.  I am just sharing what I love and how I am coping with you.

Stay well.

Let’s Take A Moment Day 403

Hi everyone.  Hope you are all well and continue to stay that way during this global health crisis we are facing.  But in addition to protecting your physical wellness, what are you doing to stay mentally healthy today?

May 2021 blog

(Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

I know we are still facing a serious situation but a new year gives us hope for the new days, seasons, opportunities & moments ahead. Still, music is something that will never change for me. It is my refuge, the most comforting part of my life & the one thing I consistently count on. So until a more normal semblance of life returns, I am going to share a song I listen to that helps me escape the current state of things, if only for a few minutes each day. And if this helps anyone else, even better.

On this day 85 years ago “The Caruso Of Rock” Roy Orbison was born. Another legend from the Sun Records label, he was born April 23, 1936 in Texas. Between his extraordinary solo career & his tenure as a Traveling Wilbury, Orbison’s career spanned four decades from the 1950’s to the 1980’s.

Popular covers of his songs were done by Linda Ronstadt (1977’s “Blue Bayou”), Don McLean (1978’s “Crying”) and Van Halen (1982’s “Oh, Pretty Woman”) but only Orbison could deliver his songs in his famed operatic style. Today’s song was the follow up to his 1961 hit, “Crying” (Day 22) and continued his chart success of that decade. The world will never see another Roy Orbison.

I love you and
I’m dreaming of you
That won’t do dream baby
Help me stop my dreaming
“.

roy and bruce

Roy Orbison and Bruce Springsteen in 1988’s “A Black & White Night”. (Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

Roy Orbison: “Dream Baby (How Long Must I Dream)” (Live performance from “Roy Orbison and Friends: A Black and White Night” filmed September 1987, broadcast on January 3, 1988 on Cinemax. Originally released in 1962, written by Cindy Walker).

I do not own the rights to anything.  I am just sharing what I love and how I am coping with you.

Stay well.