Let’s Take A Moment Day 383

Hi everyone.  Hope you are all well and continue to stay that way during this global health crisis we are facing.  But in addition to protecting your physical wellness, what are you doing to stay mentally healthy today?

May 2021 blog

(Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

I know we are still facing a serious situation but a new year gives us hope for the new days, seasons, opportunities & moments ahead. Still, music is something that will never change for me. It is my refuge, the most comforting part of my life & the one thing I consistently count on. So until a more normal semblance of life returns, I am going to share a song I listen to that helps me escape the current state of things, if only for a few minutes each day. And if this helps anyone else, even better.

From the minute music became important to me, I was interested in the details. I would read the songwriting credits on the records, the liner notes of every album & magazine interviews with my musical heroes to discover who inspired them while they were growing up. As I got older I realized my heroes had contemporary favorites as well and occasionally they would collaborate with them on recordings or at live shows.

However, it was not until I was listening to Bruce Springsteen’s speech to induct Jackson Browne into The Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame in 2004 that I realized how much Springsteen, one of music’s most eloquent & revered poets, admired Browne’s song writing skills. Springsteen spoke extensively about the beauty, intensity & sadness of Browne’s lyrics and how one song even moved Springsteen to tears. He listed about half a dozen other songs as examples of Browne’s gift which Springsteen said were the ones he wished he had written. Then he quoted a couple of lines from today’s song which is my absolute favorite track by Browne of all time.

I’m gonna find myself a girl
Who can show me what laughter means
And we’ll fill in the missing colors
In each other’s paint-by-number dreams
“.

Bruce Jackson

J Browne

Top (L-R): Bruce Springsteen and Jackson Brown circa 1987. Bottom: Browne circa 2015. (Images found online.  Original sources unknown.)

Jackson Browne: “The Pretender” (1976, written by Jackson Browne).

I do not own the rights to anything.  I am just sharing what I love and how I am coping with you.

Stay well.

Let’s Take A Moment Day 318

Hi everyone.  Hope you are all well and continue to stay that way during this global health crisis we are facing.  But in addition to protecting your physical wellness, what are you doing to stay mentally healthy today?

Shakespeare music

(Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

I know we are still facing a serious situation but a new year gives us hope for the new days, seasons, opportunities & moments ahead. Still, music is something that will never change for me. It is my refuge, the most comforting part of my life & the one thing I consistently count on. So until a more normal semblance of life returns, I am going to share a song I listen to that helps me escape the current state of things, if only for a few minutes each day. And if this helps anyone else, even better.

Watching David Letterman’s shows for over 30 years was not just an education in humor but an introduction to a lot of different people and music, too. One of his favorite guests was singer & songwriter Warren Zevon, born January 24, 1947 in IL. I saw him for the first time on Letterman’s NBC show but I had been listening to his music for years before that appearance.

Zevon’s most well known song, “Werewolves Of London” was a staple of FM radio in the 1970’s as were covers of his songs by Linda Ronstadt including “Poor Poor Pitiful Me” and today’s pick. Zevon included it on his 1976 self titled album which was produced by his friend Jackson Browne. It is a heartbreaking song about a man realizing he is losing the woman he loves not to another man but just because her feelings for him simply faded away. The beautiful harmony vocals are by Phil Everly, who met Zevon when he joined The Everly Brothers touring band in the 1970’s.

She’s so many women
He can’t find the one who was his friend
So he’s hanging on to half her heart
He can’t have the restless part”.

Warren Zevon circa 1979

Warren Zevon circa 1979. (Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

Warren Zevon: “Hasten Down The Wind” (1976, written by Warren Zevon).

I do not own the rights to anything.  I am just sharing what I love and how I am coping with you.

Stay well.

Let’s Take A Moment Day 232

Hi everyone.  Hope you are all well and continue to stay that way during this global health crisis we are facing.  But in addition to protecting your physical wellness, what are you doing to stay mentally healthy today?

Thoreau quote 2

(Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

I know we are in a serious situation, but I need a break from the gloom, doom and bullying by way of hoarding. Music has always been my refuge and watching those beautiful Italians singing to each other from their balconies reaffirmed my belief that music is the answer. So until the old normal returns, I am going to share a song I listen to that helps me escape the current state of things, if only for a few minutes each day.  And if this helps anyone else, even better.

Yesterday marked the 75th birthday of one of my favorite woefully underrated artists, singer/songwriter/actor J.D. Souther. Born John David Souther on November 2, 1945 in Detroit, Michigan he was raised in Texas where he played with a local band before moving to California in the late 1960’s. That is where he first met Glenn Frey and they formed the duo, Longbranch Pennywhistle. They released one album in 1969 that did not make any impact and disbanded a year later. Then he joined the short-lived super group, The Souther-Hillman-Furay Band with Chris Hillman (from The Byrds & The Flying Burrito Brothers) and Richie Furay (from Buffalo Springfield & Poco). They broke up after two albums due to creative clashes.

Souther is considered to be one of the architects of the southern California country rock sound thanks to his collaborations with artists like The Eagles, Jackson Browne & Linda Ronstadt. Some of the songs Souther co-wrote include “Best Of My Love”, “New Kid In Town” & “Heartache Tonight” by The Eagles, “Hearts Against The Wind”, “Faithless Love” and “White Rhythm & Blues” by Linda Ronstadt and “Heart Of The Matter” (Day 89) by Don Henley. Souther also co-wrote & sang harmony vocals on James Taylor’s 1981 hit, “Her Town Too“.

Souther started acting in the 1980’s with roles in TV’s “Thirtysomething” and the movie “Always” where he performed a fabulous version of the 1933 Broadway song made famous by The Platters in 1959, “Smoke Gets In Your Eyes“. Most recently he played the role of record producer Watty White in the show, “Nashville”. I love everything he has done but consider today’s song, a top ten hit from 1979, as my favorite of all his accomplishments.

When you need somebody around on the nights that try you
Remember I was there when you were a queen
And I’ll be the last one there beside you;
So you can call out my name
“.

JD Linda 1979

JD-SOUTHER-BW-PHOTO-BY-LINDA-RONSTADT

JD 2015

Top: Linda Ronstadt & J.D. Souther circa 1979. Middle: Souther circa 1979. Bottom: Souther circa 2015. (Images found online.  Original sources unknown.)

J. D. Souther: “You’re Only Lonely” (1979, written by J. D. Souther).

I do not own the rights to anything.  I am just sharing what I love and how I am coping with you.

Stay well.