Let’s Take A Moment Day 233

Hi everyone.  Hope you are all well and continue to stay that way during this global health crisis we are facing.  But in addition to protecting your physical wellness, what are you doing to stay mentally healthy today?

Thoreau quote 2

(Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

I know we are in a serious situation, but I need a break from the gloom, doom and bullying by way of hoarding. Music has always been my refuge and watching those beautiful Italians singing to each other from their balconies reaffirmed my belief that music is the answer. So until the old normal returns, I am going to share a song I listen to that helps me escape the current state of things, if only for a few minutes each day.  And if this helps anyone else, even better.

There were several words in the English language that scared me while I was growing up. The top two were “new wave”. They taught me that MTV was a double edged sword. Suddenly there were videos featuring that genre that were just not my thing at all. I did not get the sound of it, the feel of it or the look of it. But like most things, there were a couple of exceptions to those feelings including The Cars (Day 183), Blondie (Day 116), The Talking Heads and Squeeze. But while there were several songs from the first three artists I enjoyed, the last band had only one song I loved and that is today’s pick.

The rest of the songs I heard by Squeeze had the elements I was not fond of at all. But I did appreciate the talent of the band beginning with the nucleus of guitarists and songwriters Glenn Tilbrook and Chris Difford, who is celebrating his 66th birthday today. The song I adore features lead vocals led by Paul Carrack (the voice behind Ace and Mike & The Mechanics along with his solo records) with Tilbrook featured in the second verse with some help from one of the record’s producers, Elvis Costello. But with Carrack at the helm the song takes on a more R&B feel which is what usually pulls my soul in. The lyrics by Difford tell an interesting story of someone flirting with infidelity while the music by Tilbrook has a unique mesmerizing pull to it. The track never made it to the top 40 of the US charts but was featured prominently on FM radio and the performance video received heavy rotation in MTV’s early days. I think it is an absolutely spectacular record and it remains one of my all time favorite songs to this day.

I bought a novel, some perfume, a fortune all for you
But it’s not my conscience that hates to be untrue
I asked of my reflection, tell me, what is there to do?

squeeze carack

Squeeze 2018

Top: Squeeze circa 1981 (L-R): John Bentley (bass), Chris Difford (rhythm guitar, songwriter & backing vocals), Gilson Lavis (drums), Glenn Tilbrook (lead guitar, songwriter & vocals) & Paul Carrack (keyboards and vocals). Bottom (L-R): Tilbrook & Difford circa 2018. (Images found online.  Original sources unknown.)
Squeeze: Tempted(1981, written by Chris Difford and Glenn Tilbrook).

I do not own the rights to anything.  I am just sharing what I love and how I am coping with you.

Stay well.

Let’s Take A Moment Day 142

Hi everyone.  Hope you are all well and continue to stay that way during this global health crisis we are facing.  But in addition to protecting your physical wellness, what are you doing to stay mentally healthy today?

Charlie Brown No Music No Life

(Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

I know we are in a serious situation, but I need a break from the gloom, doom and bullying by way of hoarding. Music has always been my refuge and watching those beautiful Italians singing to each other from their balconies reaffirmed my belief that music is the answer. So until the old normal returns, I am going to share a song I listen to that helps me escape the current state of things, if only for a few minutes each day.  And if this helps anyone else, even better.

One of my favorite years for music was 1978.  New albums like Bruce Springsteen’s “Darkness On The Edge Of Town”, Eric Clapton’s “Backless”, Van Morrison’s “Wavelength”, Neil Young’s “Comes A Time”, Blondie’s “Parallel Lines”, Tom Waits’ “Blue Valentine” , Boston’s “Don’t Look Back”, “Easter” by The Patti Smith Group and The Rolling Stones’ “Some Girls” were released.  And it is from the Stones record that we arrive at today’s song which hit #1 on this day in 1978.

It only stayed in the top spot for a week, but as the lead single from the record, it helped the album get to #1 as well for two weeks that summer.  The song features a greats  sax solo and one of the best bass lines I ever heard.  And despite  the fact that  I am not much of a dancer, I could not help moving along with the infectious beat of the record.  The band was divided over whether or not it was an actual disco song, but eventually they released their first extended 12″ inch remix soon after the record topped the charts.  I prefer the original mix of this song, which is one of my favorites ever by this band.

Some Girls

   (Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

The Rolling Stones:  “Miss You” (1978, written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards).

I do not own the rights to anything.  I am just sharing what I love and how I am coping with you.

Stay well.

Let’s Take A Moment Day 116

Hi everyone.  Hope you are all well and continue to stay that way during this global health crisis we are facing.  But in addition to protecting your physical wellness, what are you doing to stay mentally healthy today?

Thoreau music quote

(Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

I know we are in a serious situation, but I need a break from the gloom, doom and bullying by way of hoarding. Music has always been my refuge and watching those beautiful Italians singing to each other from their balconies reaffirmed my belief that music is the answer. So until the old normal returns, I am going to share a song I listen to that helps me escape the current state of things, if only for a few minutes each day.  And if this helps anyone else, even better.

Between the 4th of July holiday and Ringo Starr’s 80th birthday, I missed another milestone celebration:  Debbie Harry’s 75th birthday on July 1.  Out of all the female “rock chicks” from the 1970’s/1980’s she was my absolute favorite.  I was not a real fan of punk or new wave music, but I really liked Blondie because Harry was just so cool.  As a principal songwriter & the front woman of a very popular band where she was the only female, living & hanging out in New York with people like David Bowie & Andy Warhol, being tough without losing any of her style or femininity and her incredible voice just made her a force to reckon with.  Women wanted to be like her, men wanted to date her and she wanted to sing.

She also started acting in the late 1980’s with roles in the TV show “Crime Story” and the film “Hairspray”.  Later on she appeared in two of my favorite films ever, “Cop Land” and “My Life Without Me”, the latter being a dramatic role which really showcased her talent.  Last year she wrote her autobiography entitled “Face It” which is a very good & surprisingly funny read.  She has had an incredible life and lived to tell about it, which in rock & roll is always a happy ending.

Blondie

Blondie in 1977. Left to right: Gary Valentine, Clem Burke, Debbie Harry, Chris Stein and Jimmy Destri.  (Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

Blondie:  “Dreaming” ( 1979, written by Debbie Harry and Chris Stein).

I do not own the rights to anything.  I am just sharing what I love and how I am coping with you.

Stay well.