Let’s Take A Moment Day 547

Hi everyone.  Hope you are all well and continue to stay that way during this global health crisis we are facing.  But in addition to protecting your physical wellness, what are you doing to stay mentally healthy today?

blog Sept 2021

(Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

I know we are still facing a serious situation but a new year gives us hope for the new days, seasons, opportunities & moments ahead. Still, music is something that will never change for me. It is my refuge, the most comforting part of my life & the one thing I consistently count on. So until a more normal semblance of life returns, I am going to share a song I listen to that helps me escape the current state of things, if only for a few minutes each day. And if this helps anyone else, even better.

First things first: A shout out to my four favorite ladies in TV land-Dorothy, Rose, Blanche & Sophia-who were introduced to the world as “The Golden Girls” 36 years ago today on September 14, 1985. How I love these women & how I love this show (yes, present tense on both counts). They are a part of me & always will be. Thank you, Ladies, for comedic platinum.

GG

The Golden Girls circa 1986 (L-R): Estelle Getty (Sophia/Ma), Betty White (Rose), Rue McClanahan (Blanche) and Bea Arthur (center, Dorothy). (Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

Now to the music. In September 1967 The Doors released their second album, Strange Days. Today’s song was the first single and became a Top 20 hit that year for the group. When they appeared on “The Ed Sullivan Show” for their one & only performance on September 17, 1967, today’s track was the first of two songs they performed. And watching Jim Morrison swagger up to that microphone is one of the reasons why he is one of the greatest frontmen of all time. That stage was his and he made sure everyone knew it. Sa-woon.

People are strange when you’re a stranger
Faces look ugly when you’re alone
Women seem wicked when you’re unwanted
Streets are uneven when you’re down
“.

Doors

The Doors circa 1967 (L-R): John Densmore, Ray Manzarek, Jim Morrison and Robby Krieger. (Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

The Doors: “People Are Strange” (Live performance on “The Ed Sullivan Show” September 17, 1967. Written by Robby Krieger and Jim Morrison).

I do not own the rights to anything.  I am just sharing what I love and how I am coping with you.

Stay well.

Let’s Take A Moment Day 518

Hi everyone.  Hope you are all well and continue to stay that way during this global health crisis we are facing.  But in addition to protecting your physical wellness, what are you doing to stay mentally healthy today?

Aug 2021 blog

(Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

I know we are still facing a serious situation but a new year gives us hope for the new days, seasons, opportunities & moments ahead. Still, music is something that will never change for me. It is my refuge, the most comforting part of my life & the one thing I consistently count on. So until a more normal semblance of life returns, I am going to share a song I listen to that helps me escape the current state of things, if only for a few minutes each day. And if this helps anyone else, even better.

Yesterday we remembered a happy musical event. Today marks one of the most somber days to anyone who understands the power of this man’s talent. On August 16, 1977 Elvis Presley died at his home in Graceland. I have often written that I do not like to dwell on the days we lose our musical heroes but the loss of The King cannot help but be an exception. His death 44 years ago changed the trajectory of the world much like his censored performance on “The Ed Sullivan Show” did twenty years earlier.

On the 25th anniversary of his death, RCA Records released Elvis 30 #1 Hits on August 16 2002. It included a bonus track-a remix of his 1968 song “A Little Less Conversation”-which gave The King another #1 record in several countries including the U.K. Today’s song is the first one on that album because it was his first #1 record ever. And once he got to the top, Elvis Presley never left that throne. All hail The King.

Although it’s always crowded
You still can find some room
For broken-hearted lovers
To cry there in the gloom
“.

Elvis

Elvis Aaron Presley circa 1956. (Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

Elvis Presley: “Heartbreak Hotel” (1956, written by Mae Boren Axton, Tommy Durden and Elvis Presley).

I do not own the rights to anything.  I am just sharing what I love and how I am coping with you.

Stay well.

Let’s Take A Moment Day 450

Hi everyone.  Hope you are all well and continue to stay that way during this global health crisis we are facing.  But in addition to protecting your physical wellness, what are you doing to stay mentally healthy today?

June 2021 blog

(Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

I know we are still facing a serious situation but a new year gives us hope for the new days, seasons, opportunities & moments ahead. Still, music is something that will never change for me. It is my refuge, the most comforting part of my life & the one thing I consistently count on. So until a more normal semblance of life returns, I am going to share a song I listen to that helps me escape the current state of things, if only for a few minutes each day. And if this helps anyone else, even better.

Jack “Jackie” Leroy Wilson Jr. was born 87 years ago on June 9, 1934 in Detroit, Michigan. His first solo single,1957’s “Reet Petite”, was co-written by Motown founder Berry Gordy. Today’s song was released six years later & was co-written by Wilson himself. He sang, he danced, he wrote songs & performed with everything he had. “Mr. Excitement”, as he was called, was the whole package.

‘Round and ’round we go
Where we stop nobody knows
Yeah the band is swinging on the stand
We’re moving in we’re moving out
“.

J Wilson

Jackie Wilson circa 1989. (Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

Jackie Wilson: “Baby Workout” (Live performance on “The Ed Sullivan Show” broadcast March 31, 1963. Written by Alonzo Tucker and Jackie Wilson).

I do not own the rights to anything.  I am just sharing what I love and how I am coping with you.

Stay well.

Let’s Take A Moment Day 447

Hi everyone.  Hope you are all well and continue to stay that way during this global health crisis we are facing.  But in addition to protecting your physical wellness, what are you doing to stay mentally healthy today?

June 2021 blog

(Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

I know we are still facing a serious situation but a new year gives us hope for the new days, seasons, opportunities & moments ahead. Still, music is something that will never change for me. It is my refuge, the most comforting part of my life & the one thing I consistently count on. So until a more normal semblance of life returns, I am going to share a song I listen to that helps me escape the current state of things, if only for a few minutes each day. And if this helps anyone else, even better.

The beginning of the 1970’s marked the end of an incredible era of television. After a 23 year run, “The Ed Sullivan Show” came to an end on June 6, 1971. If you lived through any of those years or are remotely acquainted with pop culture, you know some of the highlights of the program: Elvis Presley’s hips being censored, The Beatles American debut in February 1964, The Rolling Stones being forced to change the lyrics to one of their songs and The Doors refusal to do the same thing are just a few.

The first show was broadcast on June 20, 1948 under its original name, Toast Of The Town, when Sullivan was 46 years old. It was renamed for the host in 1955. His progressive attitude welcomed & embraced the changes brought about over the next two decades and he took his audience along for that incredible ride. The list of guest stars was vast and varied, from not only musicians but to comedians, actors, dancers, jugglers, ventriloquists and many more. But for me it was the musical moments I cherished the most, as it was a chance to see the singers I grew up to love who predated me.

One of the performances I absolutely adore is from soul crooner Sam Cooke in 1957. Because his life was so tragically short and his death came in the middle of the 1960’s before concerts & studio sessions were routinely recorded, any appearance he made on film that was preserved is absolutely platinum. And Sullivan’s show is one of those gems. We get to see Cooke in his prime, as a talented beautiful charming suave happy young man.

Like Sullivan, Cooke was a pioneer. He helped introduce black music to white audiences and is considered by some critics to be the inventor of soul music. He recorded today’s song in tribute to one of his idols, Nat King Cole. And thanks to the genius of Ed Sullivan, we have this superb performance by Cooke to cherish forever. Ed Sullivan was the premiere starmaker.

I think of you every morning
I dream of you every, every, every, every night
And no I’m never lonely
Whenever you are in sight
“.

Ed and Sam

Ed Sullivan (far left) watches Sam Cooke (center) perform in 1957. (Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

Sam Cooke: “(I Love You) For Sentimental Reasons” (Live performance on “The Ed Sullivan Show” broadcast on December 1, 1957 Originally released in 1957. Written by William “Pat” Best and Ivory “Deek” Watson).

I do not own the rights to anything.  I am just sharing what I love and how I am coping with you.

Stay well.

Let’s Take A Moment Day 399

Hi everyone.  Hope you are all well and continue to stay that way during this global health crisis we are facing.  But in addition to protecting your physical wellness, what are you doing to stay mentally healthy today?

May 2021 blog

(Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

I know we are still facing a serious situation but a new year gives us hope for the new days, seasons, opportunities & moments ahead. Still, music is something that will never change for me. It is my refuge, the most comforting part of my life & the one thing I consistently count on. So until a more normal semblance of life returns, I am going to share a song I listen to that helps me escape the current state of things, if only for a few minutes each day. And if this helps anyone else, even better.

The Copacabana has been one of NYC’s premier nightclubs since it opened in 1940. It has existed in many different locations throughout the city, but the desire to headline there was always the same, especially for musical artists in the 1960’s. Sam Cooke’s 1964 show was released in a live album the same year. A record of Marvin Gaye’s 1966 performance was supposed to be issued that year but because he & Motown president Berry Gordy could not agree on how the record was to be produced, the project was abandoned until 2005 when it was finally released.

Both Gaye and Cooke’s appearances at the club were done in part to follow in the footsteps of one of their favorite singers, Jackie Wilson. He made his debut there on April 19, 1962. The performance was recorded & released the same year on the album, Jackie Wilson At The Copa. He performed today’s song that night as well as on “The Ed Sullivan Show” earlier that year. It was the follow-up single to 1958’s “Lonely Teardrops” (Day 213) and was a Top 20 hit in 1959. Wilson, with his four octave tenor voice & smooth dance moves, earned the nickname “Mr. Excitement”. One watch of today’s video clip is all you need to understand why.

The way you make me feel like I belong
The way you make me right when I am wrong
The way you sacrifice just for me
Just how lucky can a poor man be”

Jackie Wilson

Jackie Wilson circa 1960. (Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

Jackie Wilson: “That’s Why (I Love You So)” (Live performance on “The Ed Sullivan Show” on January 21, 1962. Originally recorded in 1959, written by Tyran Carlo and Berry Gordy Jr.)

I do not own the rights to anything.  I am just sharing what I love and how I am coping with you.

Stay well.

Let’s Take A Moment Day 330

Hi everyone.  Hope you are all well and continue to stay that way during this global health crisis we are facing.  But in addition to protecting your physical wellness, what are you doing to stay mentally healthy today?

Feb 2021 Blog

(Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

I know we are still facing a serious situation but a new year gives us hope for the new days, seasons, opportunities & moments ahead. Still, music is something that will never change for me. It is my refuge, the most comforting part of my life & the one thing I consistently count on. So until a more normal semblance of life returns, I am going to share a song I listen to that helps me escape the current state of things, if only for a few minutes each day. And if this helps anyone else, even better.

Once upon a time on a Sunday night 57 years ago-February 9, 1964-The Beatles were announced as first time guests on “The Ed Sullivan Show” to perform a total of five songs. Today’s pick was the first one they played at approximately 8:12PM. A minute later the world changed into a brand new color called John, Paul, George & Ringo. The rest of the hues, along with music, life & Sunday nights from that point on would never be the same ever again. And for this I and the 73 million viewers who tuned in that night are eternally grateful. The end.

I’ll pretend that I’m kissing the lips I am missing
And hope that my dreams will come true
And then while I’m away, I’ll write home everyday
And I’ll send all my loving to you
“.

Beatles-ed-sullivan

The Fab Four on “The Ed Sullivan Show” on February 9, 1964. (Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

The Beatles: “All My Loving” (1963, written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney).

I do not own the rights to anything.  I am just sharing what I love and how I am coping with you.

Stay well.

Let’s Take A Moment Day 305

Hi everyone.  Hope you are all well and continue to stay that way during this global health crisis we are facing.  But in addition to protecting your physical wellness, what are you doing to stay mentally healthy today?

Shakespeare music

(Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

I know we are still facing a serious situation but a new year gives us hope for the new days, seasons, opportunities & moments ahead. Still, music is something that will never change for me. It is my refuge, the most comforting part of my life & the one thing I consistently count on. So until a more normal semblance of life returns, I am going to share a song I listen to that helps me escape the current state of things, if only for a few minutes each day. And if this helps anyone else, even better.

During The British Invasion of the 1960’s, The Rolling Stones were one of the biggest bands on the planet. But “The Ed Sullivan Show” was even more popular so the group agreed to be on the program on January 15, 1967. They wanted to perform today’s song which was their new single but Sullivan said no. He did not think the track was appropriate for his audience. But then an agreement was reached allowing the band to sing the new record if they changed the lyrics. Done. What the parties did not agree on, however, was how the singer would act while he performed. Mick Jagger rolled his eyes several times as he sang the new line making Sullivan furious. He banned The Stones from coming on his show again. But the host changed his mind and the group appeared on the program again in November 1969. Thank you Ed Sullivan for lifting the ban. Now it is time to correct the other wrong.

I feel so strong that I can’t disguise, oh my
But I just can’t apologize oh no
Don’t hang me up and don’t let me down
We could have fun just grooving around
“.

Mick 1967

Mick Jagger rolling his eyes on “The Ed Sullivan Show” in 1967. (Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

The Rolling Stones: “Let’s Spend The Night Together” (1967, written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards).

I do not own the rights to anything.  I am just sharing what I love and how I am coping with you.

Stay well.

Let’s Take A Moment Day 300

Hi everyone.  Hope you are all well and continue to stay that way during this global health crisis we are facing.  But in addition to protecting your physical wellness, what are you doing to stay mentally healthy today?

Shakespeare music

(Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

I know we are still facing a serious situation but a new year gives us hope for the new days, seasons, opportunities & moments ahead. Still, music is something that will never change for me. It is my refuge, the most comforting part of my life & the one thing I consistently count on. So until a more normal semblance of life returns, I am going to share a song I listen to that helps me escape the current state of things, if only for a few minutes each day. And if this helps anyone else, even better.

Day 300. I never imagined when I started down this road it would last this long. But then again I never lived through a global pandemic before so I did not exactly have a point of reference. Or a clue as to how much life would really change as a result of it. But this has been anything but a chore so I will keep going.

When famed Beatles record producer Sir George Martin died in 2016, Paul McCartney is reported to have said, “If anyone earned the title of the fifth Beatle it was George.” And if anyone had the right to bestow that title on someone, it was one of The Fab Four. Martin was born on January 3, 1926 in London, England. He was the man who signed The Beatles to EMI Records in 1962 and helped mold the band’s sound in the recording studio with his skills as an arranger & producer. He wore a few other hats throughout his career including musician, composer, engineer & conductor.

Martin’s influence was clear from the group’s first US album, Introducing… The Beatles, released 57 years ago today, January 10, 1964. A month later, they arrived in America for their first appearance on “The Ed Sullivan Show”. If there ever was a moment that changed the course of music history in America, it was that Beatles’ Sunday night performance on February 9, 1964. Less than a year later-January 9, 1965-The Fab Four’s popularity showed no signs of slowing down when their album Beatles 65 soared from #98 to #1 in only one week.

The rest of The Beatles story is very well documented from their 1965 concert at Shea Stadium, their final concert a year later in Candlestick Park in San Francisco, their two movie features (“A Hard Day’s Night” & “Help”) to their groundbreaking albums including Rubber Soul, Revolver, Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band, Magical Mystery Tour, The White Album & Abbey Road. Every album by the band with the exception of “Let It Be” was produced by Martin. The last one started with him in charge but then the project was put on hold for the band to record “Abbey Road“. They then returned to the Let It Be tapes to finish it but between all the fights amongst the band members including John Lennon’s departure at the beginning of 1970, the tapes were shelved. Eventually they were placed in the hands of Phil Spector who put his Wall Of Sound spin on them to give us the finished product in May 1970.

Martin continued his esteemed career in music after his seminal work with The Beatles. His more notable projects include his work on two James Bond soundtracks (“Goldfinger” in 1964 & “Live And Let Die” in 1973), producing several albums for the band America, collaborating with Pete Townsend on the musical arrangements for The Who’s 1993 Broadway production of “Tommy” & producing Elton John’s 1997 Princess Diana tribute recording of “Candle In The Wind”. Martin worked with his son, Giles Martin-also a composer, producer & multi-instrumentalist-on the arrangement of the music for the 2006 Cirque du Soleil show, “Love” based on The Fab Four’s music. The Beatles would not have been The Beatles without George Martin.

And anytime you feel the pain
Hey Jude, refrain
Don’t carry the world
Upon your shoulders
“.

Martin and The Beatles

The Beatles in the Studio with producer George Martin circa 1967 (John Lennon, Ringo Starr, George Martin (center) George Harrison and Paul McCartney. (Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

The Beatles: “Hey Jude” (Live performance from “Frost On Sunday” broadcast in the UK on September 8, 1968. Rebroadcast in the US on “The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour” on October 6, 1968. Written by John Lennon & Paul McCartney).

I do not own the rights to anything.  I am just sharing what I love and how I am coping with you.

Stay well.

Let’s Take A Moment Day 298

Hi everyone.  Hope you are all well and continue to stay that way during this global health crisis we are facing.  But in addition to protecting your physical wellness, what are you doing to stay mentally healthy today?

Shakespeare music

(Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

I know we are still facing a serious situation but a new year gives us hope for the new days, seasons, opportunities & moments ahead. Still, music is something that will never change for me. It is my refuge, the most comforting part of my life & the one thing I consistently count on. So until a more normal semblance of life returns, I am going to share a song I listen to that helps me escape the current state of things, if only for a few minutes each day. And if this helps anyone else, even better.

Today is the 86th birth anniversary for the man crowned “The King”. But this month two other key events took place in history that helped Elvis Presley earn that title. January 5, 1923 is the day Sun Records founder Sam Phillips was born in Alabama. And January 2, 1950 is the day he opened the Memphis Recording Service in TN which became Sun Studio two years later. Not only did Elvis start there, but so did Jerry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins, Johnny Cash and Roy Orbison, amongst others. Is it any wonder why Memphis is the country music capital?

If you want to pinpoint the moment rock & roll changed American culture forever, look no further than “The Milton Berle Show” broadcast on June 5, 1956. Elvis sang today’s song that night which he would not record until a month later. It was during this appearance that he stood behind a microphone for the first time without his guitar (supposedly at Berle’s suggestion) leaving The King’s gyrating hips and pelvic thrusts in full view. This caused a nationwide swoon of nearly every young girl who was watching him. But their parents were watching, too, and many of them were not happy about what they saw. The complaints flooded in which is why when Elvis went on “The Ed Sullivan Show” in September & October that year and for his third and final time on January 6, 1957, he was censored. But anyone who saw Berle’s show knew why the girls in Sullivan’s audience were screaming. Life & music as the country & the world knew it was over. Elvis was now in the building.

So in honor of the day The King was born, let’s go back to where his reign began, on Berle’s show in 1956. Part of this clip is the one Mrs. Gump & Forrest watched from a store window in the film. She may have thought he was “not for children’s eyes” but anyone who understands music knows Elvis could do no wrong. All hail The King! And thank you, Sam Phillips, for showing him the door to the throne.

Yeah, they said you was high-classed
Well, that was just a lie
Yeah, you ain’t never caught a rabbit
And you ain’t no friend of mine
“.

Sam and Elvis

Sam Phillips (L) with Elvis Presley at Sun Records circa 1954. (Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

Elvis Presley: “Hound Dog” (Live performance on “The Milton Berle Show” broadcast on June 5, 1956. Song recorded July 1956. Written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller).

I do not own the rights to anything.  I am just sharing what I love and how I am coping with you.

Stay well.

Let’s Take A Moment Day 294

Hi everyone.  Hope you are all well and continue to stay that way during this global health crisis we are facing.  But in addition to protecting your physical wellness, what are you doing to stay mentally healthy today?

Shakespeare music

(Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

I know we are still facing a serious situation but a new year gives us hope for the new days, seasons, opportunities & moments ahead. Still, music is something that will never change for me. It is my refuge, the most comforting part of my life & the one thing I consistently count on. So until a more normal semblance of life returns, I am going to share a song I listen to that helps me escape the current state of things, if only for a few minutes each day. And if this helps anyone else, even better.

On this day in 1967 the world was introduced to the genius & the beauty of Jim Morrison courtesy of The Doors. On January 4, 1967 their self-titled debut album was released. It contained a few of the songs they would become famous for including “Break On Through (To The Other Side)”, “The Crystal Ship”, “The End” & today’s track. The album also contained a cover of an old blues song written by Willie Dixon & Howlin’ Wolf, “Back Door Man”. The Doors’ love for this genre of music would play a significant role in their career, especially in their live performances.

Today’s tune was the band’s first #1 song (their second was “Hello I Love You” in 1968). It was an edited version of the album’s nearly seven minute track that stayed at the top of the chart for three weeks in the summer of 1967. That September The Doors made their only appearance on “The Ed Sullivan Show” to perform today’s pick which led to the host banning them for life after failing to follow the censor’s request to change a line of the song (See Day 145). But the band’s phenomenal success continued and soon they were featured on other variety shows on network television. Even as we approach the 50 year mark of Morrison’s death this July, the legacy he left behind in less than five years with The Doors continues in earnest. And Happy Birthday to Robby Krieger who turns 75 on January 8.

You know that it would be untrue
You know that I would be a liar
If I was to say to you
Girl, we couldn’t get much higher
“.

the-doors album

The Doors

Top: The Doors debut album from 1967. Bottom: The Doors 1967 publicity photo (L-R(: Jim Morrison, John Densmore, Robby Krieger & Ray Manzarek. (Images found online.  Original sources unknown.)

The Doors: “Light My Fire” (1967, written by The Doors: John Densmore, Robby Krieger, Ray Manzarek and Jim Morrison).

I do not own the rights to anything.  I am just sharing what I love and how I am coping with you.

Stay well.