Let’s Take A Moment Day 137

Hi everyone.  Hope you are all well and continue to stay that way during this global health crisis we are facing.  But in addition to protecting your physical wellness, what are you doing to stay mentally healthy today?

Thoreau music quote

(Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

I know we are in a serious situation, but I need a break from the gloom, doom and bullying by way of hoarding. Music has always been my refuge and watching those beautiful Italians singing to each other from their balconies reaffirmed my belief that music is the answer. So until the old normal returns, I am going to share a song I listen to that helps me escape the current state of things, if only for a few minutes each day.  And if this helps anyone else, even better.

Only two famous musicians are known to have played with both The Beatles as a group and then with all four members individually.  The first is my great love Eric Clapton, who played lead guitar on “While My Guitar Gently Weeps”, although he went uncredited on The White Album.  He then went on to play with Lennon in The Dirty Mac (along with Keith Richards on bass and Mitch Mitchell, the drummer from The Jimi Hendrix Experience) and on several songs by Lennon’s Plastic Ono Band.  Clapton played with Paul on his 2001 song, “Freedom” & at The Concert For George.  Clapton co-wrote “Badge” for Cream with George, played on his 1970 album, “All Things Must Pass” and appeared at The Concert For Bangladesh in 1971 with him as well.  Ringo was also at The Concert For Bangladesh and Clapton wrote music & played guitar for Ringo’s 1976 album, “Ringo’s Rotogravure” and 1983’s “Old Wave” amongst others.  Clapton also played with Ringo in person at The Prince’s Trust Concert in 1987 as well as The Concert For George in 2002.

The other musician to boast the same accomplishment with The Beatles was Billy Preston.  He was nicknamed “The Fifth Beatle” after playing organ for them on “Abbey Road” (on “I Want You (She’s So Heavy”) & “Something”), then he played electric piano on the “Let It Be” album and in the movie during the rooftop concert scene for “Get Back” & “Don’t Let Me Down”.  After the band broke up Preston played on John’s song “God”, on George’s album “All Things Must Pass” and at The Concert For Bangladesh.  Preston also played on a few of Ringo’s solo albums (1973’s self titled record & 2005’s “Choose Love”), in his All-Starr Band & at The Concert For George (where he sang a rousing version of “My Sweet Lord”) and played with Paul at this show as well.  And for added interest, Preston played Sgt. Pepper in the 1978 film of the same name where he sang his own version of “Get Back”.

He was hailed as a self-taught child prodigy who played with Mahalia Jackson & Nat King Cole by the ages of 10 and 11, respectively.  By the age of 16 he met The Beatles in Hamburg, Germany when he was playing with Little Richard’s band.  Later that year he played for Sam Cooke and five years later, he joined Ray Charles’ band.  He has played on several albums for The Rolling Stones and Eric Clapton while working on songs by artists like Luther Vandross, Patti LaBelle & The Band.  Preston also worked as the musical director for David Brenner’s short lived late night show, Nightlife, from 1986-1987.  He co-wrote today’s song with songwriter Bruce Fisher and both men also penned the Joe Cocker hit, “You Are So Beautiful” (there are rumors that Dennis Wilson of The Beach Boys had a hand in writing it as well but allegedly his brother Brian Wilson said that was not the case).  Preston died too young at the age of 59 in 2006 but left a legacy of great performances that showcase just how gifted he was.

Billy Preston in 2002 at The Concert For George (L) and as Sgy. Pepper (R) in the 1978 movie of the same name.  (Images found online.  Original sources unknown.)

Billy Preston:  “Nothing From Nothing” (1974, written by Billy Preston and Bruce Fisher).

I do not own the rights to anything.  I am just sharing what I love and how I am coping with you.

Stay well.

Let’s Take A Moment Day 123

Hi everyone.  Hope you are all well and continue to stay that way during this global health crisis we are facing.  But in addition to protecting your physical wellness, what are you doing to stay mentally healthy today?

Thoreau music quote

(Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

I know we are in a serious situation, but I need a break from the gloom, doom and bullying by way of hoarding. Music has always been my refuge and watching those beautiful Italians singing to each other from their balconies reaffirmed my belief that music is the answer. So until the old normal returns, I am going to share a song I listen to that helps me escape the current state of things, if only for a few minutes each day.  And if this helps anyone else, even better.

When I was 11 years old, I learned the lyrics to a song from the radio.  I only heard it once yet I knew the words to the chorus after one listen.  Yes, I had a good memory but most of the credit was due to the unique and catchy lyrics.  Even more impressive was the fact that the part of the song I learned was in French and before that I could not recall ever speaking one word in that language.  So the next time the song came on the radio, I sang along.  And my mother thought it was adorable.  Until a week later when her cousin told her what the words in french meant.

Voulez-vous coucher avec moi, ce soir?  Translation:  Do you want to sleep with me?

Even more shocking is the fact that this song was co-written by Kenny Nolan who had a hit in 1976 called “I Like Dreaming”.  How he got to that god-awful song from today’s is beyond me.  But thanks to his collaboration on today’s pick I discovered Patti LaBelle, her glorious voice and outrageous wardrobe.  Oh, and a song I was banned from ever singing again for all of eternity.  Which only made me love it that much more.  🙂

LaBelle

LaBelle circa 1975 (L-R):  Nona Hendrix, Patti LaBelle & Sarah Dash.  (Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

LaBelle:  “Lady Marmalade” (1974, written by Bob Crewe and Kenny Nolan).

I do not own the rights to anything.  I am just sharing what I love and how I am coping with you.

Stay well.

Let’s Take A Moment Day 122

Hi everyone.  Hope you are all well and continue to stay that way during this global health crisis we are facing.  But in addition to protecting your physical wellness, what are you doing to stay mentally healthy today?

Thoreau music quote

(Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

I know we are in a serious situation, but I need a break from the gloom, doom and bullying by way of hoarding. Music has always been my refuge and watching those beautiful Italians singing to each other from their balconies reaffirmed my belief that music is the answer. So until the old normal returns, I am going to share a song I listen to that helps me escape the current state of things, if only for a few minutes each day.  And if this helps anyone else, even better.

Yesterday, July 15, marked another rock & roll birthday as Linda Ronstadt celebrated her 74th.  Her voice was one from two female singers that have followed me throughout my entire life-the other belonging to Aretha Franklin.  While no one can match The Queen of Soul, Ronstadt comes closer than anyone.  Her strong powerful voice, her multi-octave range, her musical diversity and her string of hits from the 1960’s through the 1990’s is what gives her that unique status.

And when I was obsessed with all things radio in 1978, she was featured in one of my favorite movies of all time, “FM” (think of a slightly darker “WKRP In Cincinnati” without Loni Anderson or that catchy theme song).  Ronstadt sang three songs in the film, “Tumbling Dice”, “Poor Poor Pitiful Me” & “Love Me Tender” during a concert that was broadcast live over the radio station featured in the movie.  It was a terrific scene because she is a great singer who gave us a fabulous catalog of music to enjoy forever.  She is also the one who introduced The Eagles to the world as they originally began their careers as members of her back-up band.  But they were on their own by the time she took today’s song to number one in February 1975.

Linda Ronstadt            Linda Ronstadt circa 1972.  (Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

Linda Ronstadt:  “You’re No Good” (1974, written by Clint Ballard Jr.).

I do not own the rights to anything.  I am just sharing what I love and how I am coping with you.

Stay well.

Let’s Take A Moment Day 121

Hi everyone.  Hope you are all well and continue to stay that way during this global health crisis we are facing.  But in addition to protecting your physical wellness, what are you doing to stay mentally healthy today?

Thoreau music quote

(Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

I know we are in a serious situation, but I need a break from the gloom, doom and bullying by way of hoarding. Music has always been my refuge and watching those beautiful Italians singing to each other from their balconies reaffirmed my belief that music is the answer. So until the old normal returns, I am going to share a song I listen to that helps me escape the current state of things, if only for a few minutes each day.  And if this helps anyone else, even better.

It is hard to believe today’s singer passed away 17 years ago this month at the extremely young age of 58.  Barry Eugene Carter, better known to fans around the world as Barry White, is another example of someone being saved by music.  He went to jail for four months when he was 16 for stealing.  It was there he heard Elvis Presley singing “It’s Now or Never” on the radio which White took as an inspirational message to straighten out his life.  As if we needed another reason to worship Elvis.

In their obituary of White, the New York Times said his “deep voice and lushly orchestrated songs added up to soundtracks for seduction”.  Between today’s song, “You’re the First, the Last, My Everything” and “It’s Ecstasy When You Lay Down Next to Me”, White found his musical niche and ran with it.  And it was fantastic.  So was every episode of “Ally McBeal” that featured White’s songs, especially the one where White himself appeared in April 1999.  Watching the entire cast dance in front of him was one of the highlight’s of that show for me and anyone else who adores the magic of this Icon of Love.

Barry White

  Barry White circa 2000.  (Image found online.  Original source unknown.)

Barry White:  “Can’t Get Enough Of Your Love, Babe” (1974, written by Barry White).

I do not own the rights to anything.  I am just sharing what I love and how I am coping with you.

Stay well.